Wills

Are Baby Boomers Changing the Way We Die?

Quality of life. Hope. Living before leaving.

The nature of death and dying has evolved dramatically over the past century, driven in great part by Baby Boomers.

“A Good Death: How Boomers Will Change the World a Final Time” asserts that many in this generation are embracing the idea that quality of life should be the most important issue for patients and families facing terminal illness.

Think You’ve Covered the Bases? Better Check Again.

Tom Brokaw felt confident that he was prepared until this TED Talk. Here his doctor daughter interviews the NBC journalist about his future health care wishes.

Get Started (Hint: You Don’t Have to Be a Boomer)

Call 713-677-7118 or email to request an Advance Planning Packet filled with information about how to write a Life Review, how to talk to your family, and necessary legal forms such as Medical Power of Attorney and Texas Directive to Physicians and Family or Surrogates. You may also download Advance Directive forms here.

—Karla Goolsby, Houston Hospice Communication Specialist

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Helping an Aging Family Member Plan for the Future

MomAndDaughter

Take Control While You Can

The importance of advance planning for aging adults (especially those suffering from chronic illnesses) cannot be overstated. Without the right legal and financial documentation, caregivers and their loved ones could be faced with a host of problems in an emergency. Doctors may refuse to discuss important medical information with a caregiver, a dying elder may not get the end-of-life care they desire, and control over an incapacitated loved one’s bank accounts and property could be given to a complete stranger.

6 Must-Have Legal Documents for Family Caregivers

You can help a loved one plan for their current and future medical and financial needs by working with them to prepare six essential legal documents, described in further detail below:

Important documents for managing medical care

Important documents for managing finances

An elder law attorney can assist with the preparation of these documents; as well as valuable guidance for taking into account your loved one’s Familyindividual situation and preferences when planning for the future.

Don’t Wait for Disaster to Strike

Getting the necessary documents in order before a medical or financial disaster strikes can make an extremely difficult situation just a bit easier to navigate. Knowing that you’re carrying out your loved one’s wishes, even though they may not be able to voice them, can ease the crushing feelings of guilt and doubt than caregivers often experience in these situations.

*An additional note about POA: There can be confusion with regards to the difference between “durable” and “nondurable” powers of attorney. A durable POA is one that endures a person’s incapacitation, meaning that, until a person either passes away, or is able to regain control of their own affair, the POA remains in effect. This is as opposed to a nondurable POA, which becomes null upon a pre-defined contingency—such as a particular date, or in the event of a person’s incapacitation. For additional information on POA, see: Things You Can and Can’t Do With POA.

Provided courtesy of AgingCare.com, the go-to destination for family caregivers. AgingCare.com provides resources and guidance through financial and legal concerns, such as guardianship of elderly parents. This article is one of a series of articles included in the eBook, Family Caring for Family. Download your free copy at www.AgingCare.com/ebook.

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