Nursing

National Nurses Week Spotlights Most Trusted Profession

Published in nurse.com by Eileen Williamson, MSN, RN

You are celebrated during National Nurses Week for the many contributions you make to the nursing profession and the healthcare of our nation. The word “excellence,” in fact, is one we hear more than any other during Nurses Week.

Hospital executives and administrators, board members, physicians and various healthcare professionals join in the celebrations because they know that without you, their patients would not receive the same level of care.

At each event, you are recognized and applauded for your numerous achievements and accomplishments by your fellow nurses and other healthcare professionals who work closely with you and understand firsthand the excellence you bring to all you do.

Newspapers and TV stations run stories on outstanding nurses and nurse heroes who have gone above and beyond in their patient care.

Grateful patients and family members post their gratitude on social media. Even Hallmark sells nurse-themed greeting cards. My memories and recollections of Nurses Week I can’t recall a May during my four decades of nursing that didn’t include a National Nurses Week celebration. Over the years, the week became an important one for nurses across America, and each of them celebrated in some way, for the same types of reasons, at the same time.

I recall the planning that went on in anticipation and the special camaraderie and professional collaboration we all felt because we were working together. There were special gifts and meals, and each event was important. Everyone got involved and took on some type of assignment to make each event meaningful and memorable.

I remember how much it meant to all of us, and how each one of the days of our celebrations had programs to recognize different things. Who was in charge on what day was an important detail.

Celebrations took place on different shifts, and members of hospital administration came in at different times around the clock to visit patient care units and meet, greet and thank the nurses on duty. There were programs at which awards were given for research projects, poster presentations, advances in safety, recognition of special accomplishments in patient care and leadership, and more. Nurses were honored for leading special initiatives, spearheading change and heading up important projects.

I remember, too, that each year the art and science of nursing was recognized in some way. Since the time of our founder — Florence Nightingale — the art and science of nursing have been defined in different ways, and I think many of us have our own definitions.

To me, the art of nursing is the unique and individual piece of self each of us brings to our practice. The knowledge, theory, skill and experience we share with our patients is the science. Celebrations have changed over time, but the recognition of nurses’ scientific achievements and creative accomplishments have remained.

The two always worked beautifully together and were celebrated — together and beautifully as part of each Nurses Week.

Let’s revel in the meaning of Nurses Week together This week there will be many excellence programs and award ceremonies in healthcare facilities across the country, and each one will reinforce that our nursing careers are gifts for us to hold on to, treasure and nurture.
As you reflect on the meaning of this special week, we hope you will read our special National Nurses Week issue as a keepsake.

Read it, share it, refer back to it and take in all it has to offer.

Nurses, always remember to:
• Stay involved, current and abreast of professional research and advancements.
• Participate in your nursing organizations, conferences, conventions and seminars.
• Advance your education and professional certifications.
• Continue to work and learn together.

In the celebration of each Nurses Week over the course of my career, I’ve seen nurses move from rendering care to planning and designing it. In so doing that, nurses have changed the face of our profession and of healthcare. I’ve seen the public come to know us better as they met us in almost every healthcare encounter they had. It’s not just in the emergency room, operating room, delivery room or patient room, but also in physicians’ offices, ambulatory care, urgent care centers, board rooms, courtrooms and more.

I saw that in the end, the people have come to see us as the most trusted and ethical profession of all. And that gives all of us something really big to celebrate this week.

Happy National Nurses Week!

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Learning Has Shaped Oncology Nurse’s View of Patient Care

Published in oncnursingnews.com by Jean Sellers, MSN, RN

There is an old proverb I’ve heard many times, attributed to several sources: “When the student is ready, the teacher will appear.” Although I was anything but ready to face the concepts of death and dying, in 1990, my teacher appeared. He was 59 years old and presented to the emergency department with sudden onset nausea and vomiting, along with a severe headache. I vividly remember standing outside the thin curtain separating his stretcher from where I stood, dumbfounded, as the doctor introduced the words “temporal mass” and “cerebral edema” into my life.

I wasn’t a nurse then. I was a mother to 2 young girls, and I was not prepared to take care of the man behind the curtain. He was the greatest man I had ever known, the same man whom I would forever refer to as my first patient. My father. His diagnosis was an aggressive glioblastoma, and he lived 9 months from that day. I was forced into a crash course on surgery, radiation therapy, and end-of-life care. His final 2 months were spent in my home. The man who defined a “good day” as 18 holes on a golf course was now confined to a hospital bed in my guest bedroom, wearing diapers.

My family came together with the best of intentions, but we never quite had the conversations we needed to have. Some family members refused to acknowledge he was dying, and others viewed hospice care as giving up. Some did not want to treat his pain with narcotics for fear he would become addicted. I was desperate to find anyone who could help me ensure that my father would not suffer, which finally led me to call the hospice answering service—and brought another teacher in to my life.

The hospice nurse returned my call later that evening. Nothing could have prepared me for the way it felt to feel so completely heard and understood in the midst of that terrifying time. She listened to my concerns, fears, and confusion. She became my lifeline and helped my family to have the difficult conversations exploring what a “good death” could look like and what my father would want.

These lessons started me on the path I still walk today, that of an oncology nurse who advocates for quality cancer care throughout the healthcare continuum. Caring for my father opened my eyes to what was missing and I believe is still lacking today: effective palliative care.

Palliative care addresses not only symptom management but also the emotional devastation that affects both patients and their families. Today, research shows that when palliative care is integrated earlier in the disease process, outcomes improve.1 Our ability to achieve better outcomes lies in how we engage in difficult conversations. This includes an understanding of what quality of life is and, most importantly, what it means to the patient.

Nursing continues to be ranked as the most trusted profession. It should not be a surprise, as many of us are able to share a sacred space the moment we enter into the darkness with our patients. Having difficult conversations is more effective when empathy is included. Theresa Wiseman, RGN, BSc(Hons) Psych, RCNT, RNT, PGDE, a nursing researcher and scholar at the University of Southampton in the United Kingdom, says that although providing empathy is not always easy, it is a skill that can be mastered.2 It requires that we:

1. See the world as others see it
2. Be nonjudgmental
3. Understand another person’s feelings
4. Communicate understanding of what was shared

Brene Brown, PhD, LMSW, a research professor at the University of Houston Graduate School of Social Work, says empathy reminds us that we are not alone. Her research focuses on authentic leadership and the healing power of listening while allowing someone to feel they are truly heard and valued. She speaks to the basic elements of what we need to master if we, as nurses and human beings, hope to provide compassionate, empathetic care. Understanding our own vulnerabilities is a critical first step.3 Our ability to foster difficult conversations can be instrumental to breaking through feelings of isolation and loneliness that our patients and families face. This can be hard work. By acknowledging the difficulty, we take the first step toward meeting them where they are.

We may not always be ready when our teachers appear. However, I have found that when I seek to learn and enhance my ability to be there for others, I’m surrounded by many experts. I’ve lost count of the number of teachers I have been grateful to meet along the way. My teachers include nursing colleagues, physicians, researchers, and especially patients who have trusted me with their deepest thoughts. I use every opportunity I can now to urge nurses to always remember the reasons they chose this career and to remember their teachers. I urge them to never stop learning.

Jean Sellers is an administrative clinical director at UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

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NHPCO Highlights Importance of Hospice in Healthcare Since 70s

November begins National Hospice & Palliative Care Month. National Hospice & Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO) writes that hat began as primarily a volunteer-driven, grassroots movement in the 1970’s, is now an integrated part of our nation’s health care delivery system that provides care to more than 1.43 million Medicare beneficiaries and their families every year.

“Enacted as a demonstration in 1978 and a Medicare benefit in 1982 as our nation’s first coordinated care model, hospice programs have served millions of Americans and their families with compassionate care to relieve pain, manage symptoms, support patients and their family caregivers, and provided bereavement services for individuals following the death of a loved one,” said Edo Banach, president and CEO of NHPCO. “The benefit has been invaluable to patients and lifesaving for families.”

NHPCO offers a snapshot of hospice care with representative statistics from the current edition of its report, Facts and Figures: Hospice Care in America (PDF):

NHPCO provides a valuable abundance of resources with data and statistics on hospice. The organization is integral to a broad spectrum of efforts in leading the public’s understanding of hospice and palliative care and advancing the ever more vital role of hospice across the healthcare industry.

In addition, this month honors the home care and hospice community including the millions of nurses, home care aides, therapists, and social workers who make a remarkable difference for the patients and families they serve.

These heroic caregivers play a central role in our health care system and in homes across the nation.
  • In 2018, home care providers will travel about 8 billion miles to deliver the best health care in the world’
  • Ninety percent of Americans want to age in place, and home care is the preferred method of health care delivery among the disabled, elderly, and chronically ill; and
  • Home care provides high-quality, compassionate care to more than 5 million Americans annually.

As we approach the giving season, November is the perfect time to recognize their efforts.

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How do you celebrate your calling during National Nurses Week?

Published in Nurse.com by Jennifer Mensik, PhD, RN, FAAN

Make a Nurses Week resolution to recognize each other every day.

One of my favorite sayings about nursing is our ordinary is actually extraordinary. We provide an amazing service to the public, whether in hospitals, clinics, long-term care or in the community.

Being a nurse is not something we turn off completely at any time. It doesn’t stop at the end of our shift like many other professions.

We are there to help at a moment’s notice because we care. That perspective of caring is always with us and we believe we are doing what any other person might do in the same situation — that it was our job.

We have become so accustomed to the caring we do and the miracles we assist with daily, that what we and our colleagues do “daily feels” as if it is our job. As nurses, we also don’t like to take credit as we should for the healing that we assist with. Absent our caring, people would not heal and get well, and that is special.

Enter Nurse’s Day and Nurses Week. Celebrated since 1965, the original intent was to raise awareness of the important role of nursing, which mark our contributions to society. Nurses Week was first unofficially observed in October 1954, the 100th anniversary of Florence Nightingale’s mission to Crimea.

It was later changed to May 6 and officially recognized by President Ronald Reagan in 1982. The American Nurses Association expanded the holiday into National Nurses Week, celebrated from May 6 to May 12, in 1990. Over time, this week became the one time of year we as nurses truly expect we should receive external recognition for our contributions.

Organizations may do a variety of things to recognize nurses, ranging from giveaways to receptions. But does this serve the original intent of this week?

Have we all moved away from recognizing the important role in nursing that the outcome of our caring results in one week of food or tchotchkes a year? I am speaking here for administration and all nurses alike.

Let’s make a Nurses Week resolution to recognize each other more than once a year

What if each week throughout the year, you, your unit, department or organization decided to recognize yourselves? What if we recognized each other and ourselves daily? How do we give our gratitude to other nurses? How do we show our caring to others? How might this type of recognition look?

I asked many of my nursing friends how they should celebrate themselves and each other and here are some ideas:

Nursing retreats designed just for nurses by nurses. My colleagues and friends at the Arizona Nurses Association have organized this retreat for four years straight!

The DAISY recognition program is a formal program healthcare organizations can participate in to recognize the work of nurses. This program exists in all 50 states and 18 countries!

In our daily manager and administrative huddles at Oregon Health and Science University we discuss staff who deserve recognition. Clinical and non-clinical staff and managers know to escalate stories so individuals are recognized. There always are several staff members mentioned daily during these huddles.

Celebrate little victories, such as when a patient finds solace in music or speaks for the first time after visiting with a therapy dog. This might be just part of your routine day, but it is yours to celebrate. Take a moment to reflect on how your caring was part of this patient’s victory.

Write a letter to the editor in a non-nursing-related newspaper or magazine that reflects positively on the nursing profession.

Have a nursing school reunion.

Attend your state nursing association conference.

When we do not stop to recognize ourselves and others, we are not supporting ourselves or each other. When we don’t support each other, individually we can burn out and experience compassion fatigue, which makes it harder to provide a healing environment for those in our care.

Patients and families can tell when we don’t or can’t care any longer. Worse yet is we start to exhibit bullying behavior to others, instead of compassion and caring our colleagues and fellow nurses need just as much.

Nurses Week shouldn’t and can’t be just the only time we recognize, celebrate and demonstrate the importance of nursing. Each of us need to commit to a Nurses Week resolution to celebrate our profession, ourselves and each other each day!

Jennifer Mensik, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN, is division director of care management at Oregon Health and Science University and instructor for Arizona State University College of Nursing and Health Innovation DNP program. She also is treasurer for the American Nurses Association. Formerly, Mensik was vice president of CE programming for Nurse.com published by OnCourse Learning. A second-edition book she authored, “The Nurse Manager’s Guide to Innovative Staffing,” won third place in the leadership category for the American Journal of Nursing Book of the Year Awards 2017.

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Preventing the Flu: Good Health Habits Can Help Stop Germs

From the CDC and nurse.com

The single best way to prevent seasonal flu is to get vaccinated each year, but good health habits like covering your cough and washing your hands often can help stop the spread of germs and prevent respiratory illnesses like the flu. There also are flu antiviral drugs that can be used to treat and prevent flu.

  1. Avoid close contact.

Avoid close contact with people who are sick. When you are sick, keep your distance from others to protect them from getting sick too.

  1. Stay home when you are sick.

If possible, stay home from work, school, and errands when you are sick. This will help prevent spreading your illness to others.

  1. Cover your mouth and nose.

Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. It may prevent those around you from getting sick.

  1. Clean your hands.

Washing your hands often will help protect you from germs. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.

  1. Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.

Germs are often spread when a person touches something that is contaminated with germs and then touches his or her eyes, nose, or mouth.

  1. Practice other good health habits.

Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces at home, work or school, especially when someone is ill. Get plenty of sleep, be physically active, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat nutritious food.

A nurse.com article by Sallie Jimenez focused on item #4 and shared a study concluding that hand washing decreases chances for the illness to result in deaths. Jimenez writes that “In the midst of what may be one of the worst flu outbreaks in a decade, new research reinforces the importance of proper hand hygiene protocol.”

Her article references the following: A study published in the February issue of the American Journal for Infection Control found hand washing saves lives — not just in hospitals — but all healthcare facilities, including nursing homes. Researchers looked at 26 French nursing homes from April 1, 2014, to April 1, 2015, discovering consistent measures encouraging staff and visitors to wash their hands reduces mortality and antibiotic prescription rates, according to a news release from the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology highlighting the results.

During the course of the study, which included 13 nursing homes randomly assigned to an intervention group and 13 assigned to a control group, a program was implemented targeting nursing home staff, visitors and outside care providers, the news release said.

As part of the program, hand sanitizer became more readily available in both pocket-sized containers and dispensers and the idea of proper hand hygiene was promoted through posters, events, work groups and education.

“The measures resulted in a lower mortality rate of 2.10 deaths per 100 residents, versus 2.65 in the control group, with a notable 30% decrease in the mortality rate during France’s major influenza outbreak in early 2015, according to the news release.”

Although the CDC stresses the single best way to prevent the flu is to get vaccinated, proper hand washing and cleansing — either with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available — also is recommended.

 

 

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