Houston Hospice Family Honors Anniversary with Sweet Gratitude

Lyssy Family Delivers Mini Bundt Cakes to Houston Hospice Nurses Feb 2021

Pictured from left: Houston Hospice Family LeAnne and Ervin presented mini-bundt cakes to nurses and staff at Houston Hospice in honor of their loved one’s passing.

Sharing with others proves helpful during the bereavement process

 

On the anniversary of a patient’s death, Houston Hospice families honor their loved ones in a variety of ways. Our organization supports the healthy expression of love and remembrance during each person’s grief journey.

Recently, the Lyssy Family returned to Houston Hospice to express their heartfelt appreciation to the nurses and staff who cared for the matriarch of their family during her time in hospice care.

“This is the 6-month anniversary of our mother’s passing,” said LeAnne (pictured above and on behalf of her siblings). “Our family wanted to make this day special by expressing our gratitude to the compassionate nurses who showed us kindness and respect. Our mom was a nurse too and an inspiration,” she continued.

The clinical staff received dozens of mini-bundt cakes from the Pearland couple.

Houston Hospices Nurses and Staff Receive Mini-Bundt Cake from the Lyssy Family in honor of the passing of Karen Lyssy.

Houston Hospice clinical staff share their surprise, mini-bundt cakes from the Lyssy Family in honor of Karen Lyssy’s passing. Pictured from left are Serena Simms-Young, CNA; Angelina Perales, CNA; Chemane Hubbard, RN.

For more ways to donate to Houston Hospice, please visit www.houstonhospice.org/donate.

 

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Houston Hospice Names New Board Chair, Joyce Testa Salhoot

Houston Hospice Board Chair 2021 Joyce Salhoot.

Houston Hospice Board Chair Joyce Salhoot.

Meet our new Board Chair,

Joyce Testa Salhoot, MSW, MHA

 

Houston Hospice is pleased to welcome Joyce Testa Salhoot as our new Board Chair. Joyce began her service on the Board four years ago when asked by her long-time friend and former Board

Chair, Michele Sabino.  Having had many close friends who spent their final days in our care, she was familiar with the organization and its good work.  Joyce brings a great deal of expertise to the Board from her notable career. Now retired, she spent half of her career as a social worker for TIRR and the other half in hospital administration at Memorial Hermann Hospital. Originally from Niagara Falls, Joyce moved to Houston after completing her Masters of Social Work.

Goals for her Board tenure include: building a network that will support growth; ensuring the longevity of the nonprofit hospice model; and growing awareness of hospice care as a viable end-of-life care option among diverse communities. This last point is a driving passion for Joyce. “I am committed to leading efforts to foster and maintain an environment where Diversity and Inclusion are valued and achieved for the benefit of Houston Hospice staff, volunteers, patients and families.”

President & CEO Rana McClelland, MBA, echoes these thoughts: “I look forward to strategically integrating the Diversity, Equity and Inclusion initiatives developed under Joyce’s leadership into everyday operations. Our goal is to attract a diverse workforce and provide accessible services, delivered in a way that respects the needs of each individual and does not exclude anyone.”

For a complete list of the Houston Hospice Leadership Team and Board of Directors, click here.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Black History Month – Celebrating 10 African-American medical pioneers – Reposted From the Association of American Medical Colleges

Julia Haskins, Special to AAMCNews

February 25, 2019

These trailblazers broke barriers and shattered stereotypes — and went on to conduct research, discover treatments, and provide leadership that improved the health of millions.

The Flying Black Medics, created by Leonidas Harris Berry, MD, return from providing medical care and education to Cairo, Illinois, residents in 1970. National Institutes of Health and AAMC

The Flying Black Medics, created by Leonidas Harris Berry, MD, return from providing medical care and education to Cairo, Illinois, residents in 1970. – National Institutes of Health and AAMC


Read the rest of this entry »

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Houston Hospice Spirit Award Honors The Garden Club of Houston

Houston Hospice is pleased to announce this year’s Spirit Award Dinner will be honoring The Garden Club of Houston. The 22nd annual celebration will be a hybrid event, live-streaming and in-person, and is scheduled for Wednesday, October 28, 2020 from 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. at the River Oaks Country Club, 1600 River Oaks Blvd., Houston, Texas.

 

Author Elin Hilderbrand to host Houston Hospice Spirit Award Dinner

Author Elin Hilderbrand

Historically, The Laura Lee Blanton Community Spirit Award recognizes the grace and generosity of a community leader or organization that has made a positive impact on the Greater Houston Area. Established in 1924, this year’s honoree, The Garden Club of Houston, has supported a plethora of Houston area green spaces, including The Garden at Houston Hospice, in addition to providing educational programs that promote the love of horticulture in children, teens, and adults.


Read the rest of this entry »

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Tags : , , , , , , , ,

Houston Hospice Virtual Tour

Established in 1980 as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, Houston Hospice’s mission is to provide uncompromising, compassionate, end-of-life care to patients and families in our community. Join us in the Houston Hospice Virtual Tour.

As a member of the prestigious Texas Medical Center, we work closely with doctors, hospitals, and assisted living facilities to provide a holistic approach to hospice care. We are proud to say that we care for the whole patient and their families across 10 Texas counties. In addition to our specialized approach, you will have opportunities to be with your loved one when they truly need you the most. Take a virtual tour of our facility, located at 1905 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, Texas 77030. Here, you will see our private rooms, serene chapel, and The Garden at Houston Hospice, maintained by The Garden Club of Houston. We also provide care for patients at home or their facility of choice. To find out more, give us a call 24/7 at 713-468-2441 , or visit our website at www.houstonhospice.org.

About Houston Hospice
Houston Hospice is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that provides compassionate, end-of-life care to all patients and families across 10 counties in the Greater Houston Area. Established in 1980, we are the oldest, largest, independent, nonprofit hospice in Houston and a member of the Texas Medical Center.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Tags : , , , , , , , , , ,

Houston Hospice Names 2020 Volunteer of the Year

Building a culture of caring is exemplified in the life of our 2020 Volunteer of the Year, Rob Henderson, as we share his inspiration, what draws him to hospice care, and how he became Volunteer of the Year.

 

Rob Henderson has been named Houston Hospice 2020 Volunteer of the Year

Rob Henderson – Volunteer of the Year

“Rob Henderson is a committed volunteer who goes the extra mile for Houston Hospice,” said Volunteer Manager Patty Valle.

As a retired engineer, Rob has found his calling to serve others. At Houston Hospice, he volunteers his friendly smile at the main office front desk on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. In addition, he participates in our volunteer team meetings, and has served on the Employee Committee as volunteer representative.

Over the past two years, he has found many more ways to connect with others at Houston Hospice. “Rob is also one of our Home Care Volunteers and is always willing to visit or call a patient if needed,” Patty continued. “Also, he is quick to offer donations and his time to help families in need.” When he is not visiting with patients, attending meetings and answering phones, Rob finds time to assist with data entry, and recently began repairing the 100+ shutters in our inpatient unit.

“We sincerely thank Rob for the many gifts he has shared with our staff, patients, and families. He goes where Houston Hospice has a need, and is always ready for his next assignment. Rob exemplifies the true spirit of hospice volunteering,  and has made a positive impact on all of us. For this we are truly grateful,” said Patty.

Living My Best Life, an interview about family and giving back
Read the rest of this entry »

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Tags :

Safety and compassion through COVID-19

Houston Hospice works with families to ensure patients’ safety, comfort during COVID-19

 

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, Houston Hospice has taken extra precautions to guard patients, families, loved ones, and staff members from the spread of the disease caused by the Coronavirus. Their safety remains our top priority as we continue to advocate for uncompromising, compassionate end-of-life care. Increasing safety and compassion through COVID-19 is our goal.

Cynthia Nordt, VP Development, Houston Hospice

Cynthia Nordt

Safety is Paramount
Earlier this year, as confirmed cases started to rise in the Greater Houston Area, the Houston Hospice leadership team, with the support of board members, made difficult, but necessary decisions to safeguard vulnerable patients from the spread of the virus. To maintain safe and secure on-site operations, visitors are allowed at a maximum of two per patient. In addition, every person entering the building is required to have their temperatures checked, daily, and wearing safety masks is a must. To maintain 6-feet of social distancing guidelines, communal areas are temporarily closed.

Offsite, nurses and support staff are taking extra precautions to keep patients safe. For those patients who still wish to receive home care, our staff maintain sanitized proper PPE, sort medical supplies to avoid cross contamination, wash hands before and after visits and use hand sanitizer often, throughout the day. Volunteer opportunities have been paused until it is safe for all involved.

Zoom Meetings and Remote Staff 
Read the rest of this entry »

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Tags : , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Nurses Week 2020

Houston Hospice ‘s  Our Nurses

 

National Nurses Week starts with National Nurses Day on May 6, 2020 and concludes on May 12, 2020 with International Nurses Day, the birthday of Florence Nightingale, who is credited with founding modern nursing. The week-long celebration has been established as a recognized, annual event for appreciating health care workers, but you already knew this long-established, nursing-history fact. I bet you didn’t know that nurses make up over 50% of the global healthcare workforce, and on January 31, 2019, the Executive Board of the World Health Organization (WHO) endorsed a call for 2020 to be officially recognized as the ‘Year of the Nurse and Midwife’. Finally, a whole year dedicated to nurses, and it’s about time. Wouldn’t you say?

Presenting! WHO International Year of the Nurse and Midwife

 

Today’s modern nurses are Frontline Heroes, from all walks of life, and with more strength and courage than you can shake a stethoscope at.  “Houston Hospice places tremendous value in our nursing team,” says Jim Faucett, President and CEO, Houston Hospice. “Our highly skilled RN’s, LVN’s, and Nurse’s Aides epitomize hospice care excellence and are the cornerstone of Houston Hospice. Without them, we would not be able to provide the team-oriented, medical care that our patients deserve. For their faithful compassion and commitment to the needs of our patients and their families, I want to extend my deep appreciation and a Thank You to our entire Nursing Team,” continued Jim.

People of TMC

The Texas Medical Center interviewed our very own, Gabrielle Staten, RN, BSN, associate patient care manager, IPU. “We’ve been able to allow family members to visit their dying loved one when hospitals couldn’t,” stated Gabrielle. Click here to read the entire piece, highlighted on the TMC website.

Employee Committee Lights the Way


Read the rest of this entry »

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Hospice care focuses on quality and comfort of life

Published in Church Health by Dr. Susan Nelson
Hospice is a word that some people are afraid of.

For some, it conjures the image of a patient who has “given up” on medical treatment. Others may worry that they won’t get the medical care they need once in hospice.

However, hospice care doesn’t mean all medical treatment stops. It just means you and your family have decided to focus on what makes your life more comfortable, rather than continue to seek treatment for a disease that has no cure. Hospice care is 100% covered by Medicare, and 15% of hospice patients survive more than 6 months and actually get better for a time.

Over the years, I’ve had many patients in hospice care, and almost every one of them – and their families – told me they wished they had started it sooner. Hospice helps patients and families prepare for death in a dignified way that focuses on the quality and comfort of life that remains.

Rather than being a “last resort”, I think hospice offers patients and families the chance to be at home, together during this important time in life’s journey.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Helping Veterans age well after military service

Published in Military Times by Sherman Gillums Jr. and Andrew Greene

When you think of hearing aids, canes, knee pain, memory issues, and heart problems, you might envision a grandparent or elderly person. But these indicators of aging may also describe a military veteran in their late 30s or early 40s who served on numerous deployments, worked on a flight line, or parachuted from aircraft for a living.

While new military inductees are typically some of the healthiest people in our society, many find themselves anything but healthy by the time they end their careers. In fact, many find themselves coping with an accelerated aging process that combines natural aging with the service-related wear and tear on their bodies and minds.

There has always been a national interest in ensuring that veterans receive retirement benefits for serving their country. What hasn’t been emphasized are the specific challenges veterans face as they age. A 2019 study, published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, found that Persian Gulf War veterans suffered chronic conditions — such as high blood pressure, heart attacks, diabetes, stroke, and arthritis — about 10 years sooner than non-veterans the same age. This results in lower quality of life, higher mortality rates, and shorter life expectancies, especially for women veterans.

Compared to the overall population, veterans are more likely to be male, older, retired, widowed, educated, and living in the South, according to a report prepared by the LTSS Center in Boston. They also are more likely to report fair or poor health, limitations with activities of daily living, obesity, depression, and chronic conditions. This is despite the fact that there are not stark differences in financial wealth, and veterans pay less out-of-pocket for health care than civilians.

This raises the question: What is the best way to serve aging veterans who report a higher number of health and daily living issues during a greater portion of their lives than civilians?
Read the rest of this entry »

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter